Say Cheese

A couple weekends ago, we had professional family photos taken. I decided that I wanted a photo in which we would have not just our immediate family, but also my little man’s grandparents, aunt, and uncle.  I was really excited about these photos because I don’t have anything with both sides of the family in it. And I wanted to put these on display in my house, so there were a few things I had to think about when planning them out:

1. Choosing the color scheme. Since the colors in my house are mostly grays, I asked everyone to wear some sort of grey and/or white. People in the photos shouldn’t necessarily have the exact same combination (i.e. – don’t have everyone wear a blue shirt with gray shorts). The photo is more balanced when there are variations among the group. It’s also important for people to wear clothes that they feel comfortable in. Don’t make your dad wear a tie if he NEVER wears a tie. It’s not a true representation of who he is, and he’ll look stiff in the picture.

2. Picking the scene. Since I wanted everything to stay very much in the white/gray family, I chose to take the photos by an old school house. This provided the perfect backdrop. When thinking about where to take your photos, whether it’s in a studio or outside, think about how the colors of the background not only enhance what your family is wearing, but also your interiors. Also, think about what “style” you want the background to be – industrial like buildings downtown, casual and around your own house, or maybe you want rustic like an old barn. Plan it out and talk with your photographer about what look you’re going for. Once you frame these photos and put them on your wall, they can truly become art when they coordinate with the feel of whatever room you put them in.

3. Bringing meaningful ”props.” When you’re having photos of your children taken, they are way more comfortable when they’re “playing” during the photos. For instance, my little man loves to write and draw. So I brought a framed chalkboard that he could write on during photos. I also wanted to capture that side of him because it’s such a big part of who he is. Bringing a toy, balloons, or something very personal to your child can help bring out very genuine laughter and smiles that you want to capture.

4. Telling your vision to your photographer. It’s important that he or she understands the look you’re after and what kinds of poses you’d like. Having that conversation ahead of time helps them be successful in the end and gives you the best possible photos of your beautiful family.

Now that I’ve shared my tips, here are my photos! I’m so thrilled with them!! Thank you so much to Casey of Little Things Photography for taking them – check out her blog for more information on her services!

Family Photography

Family Photography

 

Interacting in Family Photos - Little Things Photography - Middle Redefined

Interacting in Family Photos – Little Things Photography – Middle Redefined

 

Using Props

Using Props

 

Being Silly

Being Silly

 

Pure Joy

Pure Joy

 

 

 

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